Burglary Defense Attorney MN

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Burglary is split into four degrees. First degree burglary means entering a building without consent, either with intent to commit a crime or committing a crime once inside, and one of the three following elements: the building is a dwelling and someone else is in it, the offender possesses a dangerous weapon, or the offender commits an assault in or near the building. This offense carries a sentence up to 20 years in prison and/or up to a $35,000 fine; the minimum sentence is six months in the workhouse.

Second degree burglary has two possibilities, both carrying a sentence of up to 10 years in prison and/or up to a $20,000 fine. It means entering a building without consent, either with intent to commit a crime or committing a crime once inside, and one of the four following elements: the building is a dwelling, part of the building is used for certain monetary businesses like banking, part of the building is used for a legal drug business like a pharmacy, or the offender uses a tool to get money or property. The other possibility for second degree burglary is if the building is a government, religious, historic, or school building and the offender enters without consent and either with intent to commit a theft or property damage or commits such a crime.

Third degree burglary means entering a building without consent and either with intent to steal or commit a felony or gross misdemeanor in the building or commits such a crime. The sentence is up to 5 years in prison and/or up to a $10,000 fine.

Fourth degree burglary means entering a building without consent and either with intent to commit a misdemeanor not stealing or commits such a crime. The sentence is up to 1 year in prison and/or up to a $3,000 fine.

For all state burglary offenses, see https://www.revisor.mn.gov/statutes/?id=609.582.

Federal burglary of the post office—using force to break into a post office intending to commit larceny or a similar crime in the post office—can be sentenced up to 5 years in prison and/or a fine. See 18 U.S.C. § 2115: https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/18/2115.

The preceding was a summary of the law. It does not describe all of the elements of the crimes. Laws are also constantly changing. You need to contact a skilled burglary defense attorney MN to discuss the offenses in detail and with respect to your own particular case. Nothing in this description or anywhere on this site is legal advice.

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