Dec 19

What is a white-collar crime?

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Mail theft—intentionally taking mail not belonging to you and without permission from a mailbox or a mail carrier—carries a sentence of up to 3 years in prison and/or up to a $5,000 fine.
Forgery—using a knowingly false writing for identification or recommendation, for example—carries a sentence of up to 3 years in prison and/or up to a $5,000 fine.
Check forgery—falsely creating or changing a check or falsely endorsing a check or trying to pay with a forged check—carries a sentence of up to 20 years in prison and/or up to a $100,000 fine, depending on the amount of the check or the amount of whatever is trying to be obtained.
Federal forgery and counterfeiting, for example, is governed by 18 U.S.C. §§ 470–514.
Federal embezzlement and theft is governed by 18 U.S.C. §§ 641–670. If you embezzle or steal a record, money, or other item of value from the United States or its department or agency, you could be sentenced to up to 10 years in prison and/or a fine under 18 U.S.C. § 641
Federal mail fraud and other fraud offenses are governed by 18 U.S.C. §§ 1341–1351. Frauds and swindles generally are governed by 18 U.S.C. § 1341.
Wire fraud—fraud using wire transmissions in interstate commerce—can be sentenced to up to 20 years in prison and/or a fine under 18 U.S.C. § 1343.
Bank fraud—defrauding a bank—can be sentenced by up to 30 years in prison and/or up to a $1,000,000 fine under 18 U.S.C. § 1344. See generally 18 U.S.C. §§ 1341–1351.